Locals are resisting Australian govt moves to put nuclear trash toilet in South Australia

South Australia nuclear toilet

The indigenous group Adnyamathanha Camp Law Mob says while the property is governed by a perpetual lease, meaning no native title claim can be lodged over the area, Aboriginal heritage legislation does apply.

“We demand that the Federal Resources Minister Josh Frydenberg publicly declare who he has consulted regarding these nominations, and who has the authority to nominate these si­tes,” spokeswoman Jillian Marsh said in a statement.

Cortlinye and Pinkawillinie KIMBA is known as “the Gateway to the Gawler Ranges”. But some residents fear the township would become known as “the Gateway to the National Nuclear Waste Facility” should it be selected as the future site to store radioactive waste. Local farmers Toni Scott, Sue Woolford, Helen Harris and their families have vowed to fight any move to build the facility in their district.

“They’re saying this is a voluntary process but how is this voluntary?,” Mrs Scott said.

“We’re not volunteering, we don’t want any money and we don’t want to live next to it.’’

The group vowed to be vocal during the Federal Government’s consultation in Kimba next week

Nuclear waste repository in SA: What do the locals think? The Advertiser, 22 Nov 2015 BRYAN LITTLELY, PAUL STARICK and MEAGAN DILLON   PICKING a site for a nuclear dump is as contentious a decision as you will find. Whichever of the six Australia-wide candidates that is chosen to be the nation’s nuclear repository will acquire a degree of notoriety.

South Australia is home to three potential dump locations. Unsurprisingly, emotions are running hot on both sides of the debate.

ISOLATED Barndioota station offers an almost uninhabitable wasteland as a potential site for a nuclear waste dump. Signs of life on the majority of 25,000ha Outback station northwest of Hawker in the State’s far north are limited to emus, kangaroos, wild horses, and the station cattle.

It is hard to see this land — saltbush spattered sand-dunes and plains which spring to life only after the irregular flooding rains flowing from the Flinders Ranges to Lake Torrens — being of great value to most. But it is.

Station owner, former Liberal senator Grant Chapman, recognised its suitability for a radioactive waste dump site, based on safety measures he investigated almost 20 years ago.

Mr Chapman, whose Barndioota station is among three SA properties short-listed for the dump, said the waste would be safer there than in hospitals, universities and other city locations.

He chaired a Senate-select committee which studied radioactive waste dangers and in 1996 proposed a national repository.

The 100ha short-listed site, is at the northern end of the cattle station, which is owned by Mr Chapman’s family and business partner.

But Mr Chapman is not the only person who sees value in the site. The Adnyamathanha Camp Law Mob see value in the land, for a much different reason.

The indigenous group says while the property is governed by a perpetual lease, meaning no native title claim can be lodged over the area, Aboriginal heritage legislation does apply.

“We demand that the Federal Resources Minister Josh Frydenberg publicly declare who he has consulted regarding these nominations, and who has the authority to nominate these si­tes,” spokeswoman Jillian Marsh said in a statement.

“We want to know who are the experts with local knowledge that took part in the advisory panel prior to these sites being nominated as waste sites?”

The Adnyamathanha group questioned which traditional owners had been consulted, saying they wanted no further expansion of the nuclear industry.

“What traditional knowledge from thousands of years of occupation has been incorporated into the decision-making?

“We have taken part in the SA Nuclear Fuel Cycle Royal Commission, and our views along with many others are clearly stated in our submission that we do not support any expansion of a nuclear industry this includes the imposition of a radioactive waste dump on Adnyamathana country at Barndioota,’’ Ms Marsh said.

“That’s what traditional owners do. We care for our country. We only wish governments and industries would do the same. Stop playing with our future and care for our country.’

Mr Chapman, also a former Liberal Party state president, said he had been notified of the short-listing only last Thursday and this was the start of a consultation process lasting about a year, before final site selection.

Mr Chapman said he was unconcerned about safety, having extensively studied the process when he chaired the Senate Select Committee on the Dangers of Radioactive Waste.

“It’s much safer and more secure to have it in a purpose-built site,” he said.

Cortlinye and Pinkawillinie KIMBA is known as “the Gateway to the Gawler Ranges”. But some residents fear the township would become known as “the Gateway to the National Nuclear Waste Facility” should it be selected as the future site to store radioactive waste. Local farmers Toni Scott, Sue Woolford, Helen Harris and their families have vowed to fight any move to build the facility in their district.

The Federal Government has short-listed six potential sites across Australia — two of which are in the Kimba area, about 500km northwest of Adelaide. One is at Cortlinye, about 15km from the Kimba township, the other at Pinkawillinie, another 20km further west.

Mrs Woolford said the town would forever carry the stigma of a dumping ground for radioactive waste should it be selected.

“We’re on agricultural land, this is not an industrial area, so how could we even get to this stage in their site selection?” she said.

Mrs Harris said there could be issues selling grain from the area if buyers knew it was produced next to a nuclear waste dump.

“My son, daughter-in-law and grandchildren might be leaving the district if this goes ahead,” she said.

But others believe a dump would be good for the region.

Third-generation Kimba farmer Jeff Baldock is concerned the town could suffer if something was not done to stimulate the local economy and create new job opportunities.

The facility has the potential to provide a reported 20 jobs and about $10 million would be put into a community fund to help the town.

“It’s not very often you get opportunities like this dropped in your lap,” he said.

As a possible solution to boost the economy, Mr Baldock has nominated a 100ha parcel of his land to the Federal Government as a site for the nation’s first nuclear storage facility.

“That’s the big thing for us, that a nice, little community fund would be available for the town,” Mr Baldock said.

“This may or may not be the answer but surely we have a look and find out all about it,” he said.

Mrs Scott admitted the town needed to look at ways to stimulate the economy but believed there were other ways to do it.

“We do need to look at ways to bring money into our town, don’t get me wrong, but I just don’t think putting a radioactive waste dump in our town is the solution to saving it,’’ she said.

“We don’t have everything here in Kimba, that’s true, but we chose to live here for a reason.”

The three farming families have put together a map of the district and have been contacting each resident to gauge their view of the proposal.

Many of the families surround the Cortlinye site.

“They’re saying this is a voluntary process but how is this voluntary?,” Mrs Scott said.

“We’re not volunteering, we don’t want any money and we don’t want to live next to it.’’

The group vowed to be vocal during the Federal Government’s consultation in Kimba next week………http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/nuclear-waste-repository-in-sa-what-do-the-locals-think/story-fni6uo1m-1227618708567

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One Response to “Locals are resisting Australian govt moves to put nuclear trash toilet in South Australia”

  1. Christina MacPherson Says:

    Reblogged this on nuclear-news.

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